House Arrest in Clark County Detention Center

House Arresr Las Vegas Criminal Defense Attorney Ross Goodman

House arrest is a type of incarceration wherein the charged individual stays in his own home. However, this is not in any form a lighter penance as the property where he is staying will still be heavily guarded by detention officers. There are also strict laws such as boundaries and limits, which when violated, can lead to graver criminal consequences.

The Clark County Detention Center (CCDC) implements the Electronic Monitoring Program or commonly referred as house arrest, wherein a certain convict will be tagged with an electronic ankle bracelet that will monitor his moves and whereabouts. The said program is applicable to different cases depending on the magnitude and the factors involved.

Below are further pieces of information about house arrests in CCDC and how a criminal defense attorney can assist you on the program.

Qualification for House Arrest Program

House arrest is an alternative sentencing program decided by a judge. Usually, it applies to defendants who can post bail but have committed crimes that are too severe for them to be granted an immediate freedom.

Most of the time, the judge gives a house arrest sentencing to misdemeanor cases that are non-violent (like DUI) and to defendants who are not dangerous and not flight-risk. Cooperativeness and complying with all of the judge’s requirement will help influence a judge’s decision.

When granted of house arrest, CCDC’s Metropolitan Police Department will run the program, starting with the installation of the GPS-based electronic bracelet on the defendant’s ankle. CCDC uses a tamper-proof device that should be paid by the defendant.

The Electronic Monitoring Program starts immediately once the ankle bracelet is worn. Aside from the confinement, the defendant will have to undergo several rehabilitation programs in his own home.

Benefits to the community

House arrest is economical. With the growing number of inmates in CCDC and the Nevada State Prison, many judges are willing to put non-violent defendants under a monitoring program because at least $140 are spent on each inmate behind bars.

When defendants are confined in their homes, they are responsible for their own food, shelter, and other commodities, thus helping the CCDC and the entire community save not just money, but resources as well.

Conditions of house arrest

Depending on the case, an individual put down for house arrest can leave the house under strict monitoring. The court also lays down the places where someone in house arrest can go. Stopover is prohibited; otherwise, the Metropolitan Police Department will be notified to re-arrest the defendant.

The judge usually allows outdoor engagements such as:

  • Work and school
  • Court trials
  • Community service and counseling
  • Medical and lawyer appointments

Violation of the program

An ankle bracelet should be worn at all times by the defendant and should not be tampered. In Nevada, house arrests employ a non-tolerance policy, which means that once you violate the rules, you will be taken back to CCDC where you will spend the rest of your sentence. Additional sentences and payments for damages may also be charged to the offender in case he violates the rules.

Violations include:

  • Going beyond exclusion zones
  • Tampering or breaking the device
  • Breaking curfew

If a defendant has a DUI case, especially related with alcohol, a supplementary ankle bracelet called Secure Continuous Remote Alcohol Monitor (SCRAM) should also be worn by the defendant. Once it traces alcohol in the offender’s body system, the police will be alerted.

A house arrest is favorable for people who are charged of crimes but know that it does not erase the fact that they hold a criminal record. Meet with a criminal defense attorney today to help you get absolved of your charges today.

Las Vegas Criminal Defense Attorney Ross Goodman

520 S 4th St, Las Vegas, NV 89101, USA

702-383-5088

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s