Tag Archives: Arrest

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4 Types of Checkpoints You Might Encounter in the US

Attorney Ross Goodman
520 S 4th St,
Las Vegas, NV 89101
Phone: (702) 383 – 5088
Fax: (702) 385 – 5088

Different checkpoints have different purposes but their main goal is to enforce the law and to ensure that citizens would comply with the law. Here are some types of checkpoints that you might encounter in the US.

Sobriety Checkpoints

1This type of checkpoint is where officers usually check if the driver is impaired from drinking or from other substances. This is where DUI arrests usually happen. Usually, you would see sobriety checkpoints during the time when DUI/DWI cases are rampant such as holidays, weekends, events within the area, etc. (Source: AAA DUI Justice Link)

Witness Checkpoints/Information-seeking Checkpoints

5The purpose of this checkpoint is not to catch criminals. Their purpose is to gather information from about recently committed crimes within the area. Policemen usually ask for assistance from the public in identifying vehicles or people that could be involved in a crime or accident. (Source: Criminal Procedure by Joel Samaha)

Driver’s License Checkpoints

6The objective of this checkpoint is to make sure that the driver’s license of the motor vehicle driver is not fake nor expired. It could be unconstitutional if the checkpoint does not have legitimate reason for setting up the checkpoint. It could only be constitutional if the driver’s license checkpoint was conducted in a predesignated manner. (Source: The Police Chief)

Border Patrol Checkpoints

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These checkpoints are usually located in hidden areas. But you could expect them in several parts of northern and southern Border States such as California, Texas, Arizona, Alaska, Michigan, New York, and many others. This type of checkpoint usually requires drivers to verify their residence status or present documents that prove their right to be in the United States. (Source: ACLU)

Just remember, the authorities are allowed to use roadblocks for specific purposes. The legality of a checkpoint depends on its primary purpose. For instance, a general crime control checkpoint is a Fourth Amendment violation because it is not valid.